Photos of The People and Culture of Cuba, Cuba

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The People and Culture of Cuba

Cuba’s population of over 11 million is very mixed, because of its colonial history, in which the original native American population was largely supplanted by Spanish, imported African slaves and later Asians (mainly Chinese), with widespread intermarriage between the various groups. Consequently it is almost impossible to determine percentages of people of various lineages but in a country like Cuba this doesn’t really matter, as can be seen in these photos.

Street performers, old Havana
 
Street performers, old Havana
 
Street performers, old Havana
 
Boys, old Havana
 
Street performers, old Havana
 
Street performers, old Havana
 
Street performers, old Havana
 
Living statue performer
 
Children at puppet show
 
Demonstration of Capoeira
 
Street performance, Callejón de Hamel
 
Street performer, Callejón de Hamel
 
Along the Malecón
 
View from La Casa de Estrella
 
Boys playing chess, Havana
 
Women in traditional dress, Havana
 
Playing football in Parque Humboldt
 
Book store, Havana
 
Boys with iPad and iPhone, Viñales
 
Boys ready for school, Viñales
 
Exercises on Parque Martí
 
Parque Martí from west, Cienfuegos
 
Templo de Santería Yemayá, Trinidad
 
Templo de Santería Yemayá, Trinidad
 
Young girl, Trinidad
 
Four girls, Trinidad
 
Children of Trinidad
 
Young boy of Trinidad
 
Children of Trinidad
 
'Los Pinos' music group, Trinidad
 
'Los Pinos' music group, Trinidad
 
'Los Pinos' music group, Trinidad
 
'Los Pinos' music group, Trinidad
 
Souvenir seller, Trinidad
 
Men playing dominoes, Trinidad
 
Cuban musical group, Finca El Oasis
 
School children, Camagüey
 
Selling vegetables, Bayamo
 
Music group, Santiago de Cuba
 
Children playing, Santiago de Cuba
 
School children, Santiago de Cuba
 
School children, Santiago de Cuba
 
Changing of the Guard, Santa Ifigenia
 
School children, Santiago de Cuba
 
Girls, Santiago de Cuba
 
Casa de Trova, Baracoa
 
Young girl, Baracoa
 
Children in class, Baracoa
 

Havana has lively scenes of street theatre, with stilt walkers, music, children’s puppet shows and demonstrations of Brazilian martial arts on the various squares in the city, while in Callejón de Hamel, with its shrine to Afro-Cuban religions, Rumba groups play every Sunday. Although many Afro Cubans adhere to the Catholic faith, it is often practiced together with Santería, an Afro-American religion that developed here among the descendants of slaves, brought from West Africa. Its sacred language is Lucumí, a creolised remnant of the Yoruba language, a West African language spoken mainly in Nigeria and Benin. There are regular ceremonies, like in the Casa Templo de Santería Yemayá in Trinidad.

Music is everywhere, on the street, in cafés and roadside restaurants. Santiago de Cuba is considered the place where African rhythm first encountered Spanish tradition to produce the island’s inimitable music and it has numerous music halls, with the “Casa de la Trova” the first and most famous. There are now Trova halls in most Cuban cities, like the Casa de Trova in Baracoa, where local musicians perform daily for an appreciative audience.